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It started when two canine scientists decide to become pen pals in an era of digital media...

About

The beginning
Two canine scientists, Julie Hecht and Mia Cobb, met briefly at the 3rd Canine Science Forum conference in Barcelona in late July, 2012. They share a passion for canine science, good communication, social media and fun. 

Julie works in the field of canine behaviour and cognition and explores why and how we humanise our canine companions. Mia researches the behaviour, physiology, welfare and performance science of working dogs. Both are enthusiastic, entertaining and a little bit deaf.

It was at the 3rd Canine Science Forum that Mia and Julie decided to embark on a two-year adventure as digital pen pals, taking turns posting on topics related to their own research and other dog science topics. Do You Believe in Dog? amassed an enthusiastic following of dog lovers and fellow canine scientists. Readers have enjoyed posts on everything from love and loss to welfare problems hiding in plain sight. Since 2012, we've been lucky to have guest posts from our colleagues in the field on topics like wild dogs, canine learning, and dog breed perceptions. 

The Do You Believe in Dog? blog, Facebook and Twitter feeds have become vibrant places to access canine science studies and thoughtful commentary. 

In June 2014, Mia and Julie brought their intimate familiarity of canine science to #SPARCS2014 when they hosted an international, three day, TED-style canine science conference that was live-streamed globally with over 47,000 hits worldwide.


Do You Believe in Dog? founders, Mia Cobb & Julie Hecht (with friend, Chester)


The future
In July, 2014, Mia and Julie met again at the 4th Canine Science Forum in Lincoln, UK. After two years of mostly pen-pal style blogging, Mia and Julie decided to broaden the scope of Do You Believe in Dog? to include wider participation from their fellow canine scientists. 


Contribute:

Following the format of earlier guest posts, researchers and students of canine science are welcome to submit short blog posts (~800 words) based on peer-reviewed research (your own or others). Importantly, posts should be accessible to a general dog-loving audience. For Mia and Julie, this often means taking everything you know about academic writing and throwing it far out the window! Accepted guest posts will be shared with the established network of canine science enthusiasts that make up the Do You Believe in Dog? community. 

Check out our contributors to-date.

If you'd like more information, feel free to send us an email to discuss writing a guest post: doyoubelieveindog@gmail.com

Follow along as Do You Believe in Dog? continues to evolve! Join us as we consider one of our greatest questions, "Do you believe in dog?"


Mia and Julie’s work has been featured on Psychology Today, Scientific American, The Huffington Post, The Bark, ohmidog!, ABC The Drum, Business Insider, Dumbo Feather, The Dodo, The Age, Salon, The New York Companion and The New York Times.  Television appearances include NBC Nightly News, Totally Wild, Science&U!, Channel 10 News, Hound TV and the PBS NOVA scienceNOW program.


The content on Do You Believe in Dog? is copyrighted. 
If you are interested in using any content produced on Do You Believe in Dog?, please email a request.